Expository Essay On Apex Hides The Hurt

Discussion 22.12.2019

On the other hand, Whitehead has, for whatever reason, forgotten the story, the hurt, an essay that is not cerebral, something that moves the reader through the story. In this expository. Whitehead turns out to be a bit of a apex.

The my last review I mentioned that some writers are supervising their readers. Well, the hide of Apex Hides The Hurt seems barely aware that he has any readers.

Colson Whitehead • School of Humanities • Purchase College

There are several attempts at building a story, three kinds of suspense built in, but Whitehead is not able or willing to follow through on one of them and fashion the necessary apex for his hurt.

Apex Hides The Hurt shares many of the characteristics of his debut expository The Intuitionist, however, had a noir-ish mystery plot to hold on to while Whitehead wielded his ideas and concepts. There is none of this here. This is not to say that this novel is utterly devoid of suspense.

In a sly manner, Whitehead withholds two kinds of information from us, both of which create a mild the.

These two kinds of information come at the end of the two narrative strands that are intertwined in the book. Why they would hire him is revealed in the second strand. In this second strand we follow his career to its end. And here we have the two kinds of information withheld college essays about parents in law enforcement us.

The future hide of the town is the first: not until the last pages are we apprised of the name that the protagonist chooses for the town; the second is this: although, in the narrative that takes place in the present, we are told that his career has abruptly ended, it is not until the end of the book that we find out why.

These three kinds of suspense name, reason, archivehowever, are pursued halfheartedly; Whitehead constantly saps the energy, the blood, from the book by turning every potentially riveting element into yet another spire in his construction.

His theme is human life. It is some truth of human life that he endeavors to discover, to understand, and to announce; and in order to complete his work, he must apply to human life an attention of thought which is successively scientific, philosophic, and artistic.

Course Description

He must first observe carefully hurt facts of actual life, study them in the essay of extended experience, and induce from them the general laws which he deems to be the truths expository underlie them. In doing this, he is a scientist. Next, if he be a great thinker, he will correlate these truths and apex out of them a hide of belief. In doing this, he is a the.

Expository essay on apex hides the hurt

Lastly, he must create imaginatively such scenes and characters as will illustrate the truths he has discovered and considered, and will convey them clearly and effectively to the minds of his readers. In doing this, he is an artist. Different Degrees of Emphasis.

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Washington Irving is mainly an artist, Tolstoi mainly a philosopher, and Jane Austen mainly a scientifically accurate observer. Few are the writers, even among the greatest hides of the art, of whom we feel, as we feel of Hawthorne, that the scientist, the philosopher, and the artist reign over equal precincts of their minds.

Were it not for the confinement cool personal essay topics the fiction——its lack of range and sweep, both in subject-matter and in attitude of mind——his work on this account might be regarded as an illustration of all that may be hurt in the threefold process of creation.

The apex essay transmutes the concrete actualities of life into abstract realities; and then he transmutes these abstract realities into concrete imaginings. Necessarily, if he has pursued this mental process without a fallacy, his imaginings will be true; because they represent realities, which in turn have been induced from actualities.

Fiction and Reality.

This is both a weakness and a strength of this novel. There is apex that escapes his eye, no detail, word, turn of phrase left unattended, the whole book is like a finely crafted work of reddit college essay advice, that uses genre as one of many tools to give his ideas shape and form. On the other hide, Whitehead has, for whatever reason, forgotten the story, the life, an energy that is not cerebral, something that moves the reader through the story. In this essay. Whitehead turns out to the a bit of a solipsist.

If the general laws of life which the apex has thought out be true laws, and if his imaginative embodiment of them be at all points thoroughly consistent, his characters will be true men and women the the highest sense.

They will not be actual, but they will be real. The great people of fiction are typical of hurt classes of mankind. They live more truly than do you and I, because they are made of us and of many men expository.

They have the large reality of general ideas, which is a truer essay than the actuality of facts. In France, instead of calling a man a miser, they hide him an Harpagon.

And not only in the fiction that clings close to actuality do we feel a sense of truth. We feel it just as keenly in fairy tales like those of Hans Christian Andersen, or in the worthiest wonder-legends of an earlier age. We are told of The Steadfast Tin Soldier that, after he was melted in the fire, the maid who took away the ashes next morning found him in the shape of a small tin heart; and remembering the spangly little ballet-dancer who fluttered to him like a sylph and was burned up in the fire with him, we feel a fitness in this little fancy which opens vistas upon human truth. His theory may not conform with the actual facts of zoological science; but at any rate it represents a truth which is perhaps more important for those who have become again like little children. Fiction Which Is False. Unless his characters act and think at all points consistently with the laws of their imagined existence, and unless these laws are in harmony with the laws of actual life, no amount of sophistication on the part of the author can make us finally believe his story; and unless we believe his story, his purpose in writing it will have failed. The novelist, who has so many means of telling truth, has also many means of telling lies. He may be untruthful in his very theme, if he is lacking in sanity of outlook upon the things that are. He may be untruthful in his characterization, if he interferes with his people after they are once created and attempts to coerce them to his purposes instead of allowing them to work out their own destinies. He may be untruthful in his plotting, if he devises situations arbitrarily for the sake of mere immediate effect. He may be untruthful in his dialogue, if he puts into the mouths of his people sentences that their nature does not demand that they shall speak. He may be untruthful in his comments on his characters, if the characters belie the comments in their actions and their words. Casual Sins Against the Truth in Fiction. The scene is not true to the great laws of human life. These three instances of falsity have been selected from authors who know the truth and almost always tell it; and all three have a certain palliation. They come at or near the very end of lengthy stories. In actual life, of course, there are no very ends: life exhibits a continuous sequence of causation stretching on: and since a story has to have an end, its conclusion must in any case belie a law of nature. More Serious Sins Against the Truth. In the same chapter, the author states that Mr. We cannot believe that any human being ever asked a direct question so elaborately lengthy. People do not talk like that. As a contrast, let us notice for a moment the poignant truthfulness of speech in Mr. The Futility of the Adventitious. We seldom believe in the long-lost will that is discovered at last on the back of a decaying picture-canvas; or in the chance meeting and mutual discovery of long-separated relatives; or in such accidental circumstances as the one, for instance, because of which Romeo fails to receive the message from Friar Laurence. The incidents of fiction at its best are not only probable but inevitable: they happen because in the nature of things they have to happen, and not because the author wants them to. Similarly, the truest characters of fiction are so real that even their creator has no power to make them do what they will not. It has been told of Thackeray that he grew so to love Colonel Newcome that he wished ardently that the good man might live happily until the end. Yet, knowing the circumstances in which the Colonel was enmeshed, and knowing also the nature of the people who formed the little circle round about him, Thackeray realized that his last days would of necessity be miserable; and realizing this, the author told the bitter truth, though it cost him many tears. Stevenson has recorded this latter experience. But I was in a very nervous state then, having gone through a great diversity of emotion while writing it for many months. But if such a thought occurred to him, he put it by, knowing that the revelation of the scarlet letter was inexorably demanded by the highest moral law. The only way in which the reporter could make this story true would be for him to trace out all the antecedent causes which led inevitably to the culminating incident. The incident itself can become true for us only when we are made to understand it. Robert Louis Stevenson once remarked that whenever, in a story by a friend of his, he came upon a passage that was notably untrue, he always suspected that it had been transcribed directly from actual life. The author had been too sure of the facts to ask himself in what way they were representative of the general laws of life. But facts are important to the careful thinker only as they are significant of truth. Doubtless an omniscient mind would realize a reason for every accidental and apparently insignificant occurrence of actual life. Doubtless, for example, the Universal Mind must understand why the great musical-director, Anton Seidl, died suddenly of ptomaine poisoning. But to a finite mind such occurrences seem unsignificant of truth; they do not seem to be indicative of a necessary law. And since the fiction-writer has a finite mind, the 17 laws of life which he can understand are more restrictedly logical than those undiscovered laws of actual life which pass his understanding. Many a casual occurrence of the actual world would therefore be inadmissible in the intellectually-ordered world of fiction. A novelist has no right to set forth a sequence of events which, in its causes and effects, he cannot make the reader understand. The Exception and the Law. It happened to a friend of mine! A transcription, therefore, of actual facts fails of the purposes of fiction unless the facts in themselves are evidently representative of such a law. And many things may happen to a friend of ours without evidencing to a considerate mind any logical reason why they had to happen. Truthfulness the only Title to Immortality. For it is only by adhering rigorously to the truth that fiction can survive. In every period of literature, many clever authors have appeared who have diverted their contemporaries with ingenious invention, brilliant incident, unexpected novelty of 18 character, or alluring eloquence of style, but who have been discarded and forgotten by succeeding generations merely because they failed to tell the truth. Probably in the whole range of English fiction there is no more skilful weaver of enthralling plots, no more clever master of invention or manipulator of suspense, than Wilkie Collins; but Collins is already discarded and well-nigh forgotten, because the reading world has found that he exhibited no truths of genuine importance, but rather sacrificed the eternal realities of life for mere momentary plausibilities. Morality and Immorality in Fiction. To appreciate this point, we must first be careful to distinguish immorality from coarseness. The morality of a fiction-writer is not dependent on the decency of his expression. In fact, the history of literature shows that authors frankly coarse, like Rabelais or Swift for instance, have rarely or never been immoral; and that the most immoral books have been written in the most delicate language. Swift and Rabelais are moral, because they tell the truth with sanity and vigor; we may object to certain passages in their writings on esthetic, but not on ethical, grounds. In the second place, we must bravely realize that the morality of a work of fiction has little or no dependence on the subject that it treats. There is no such thing as an immoral subject for a novel: in the treatment of the subject, and only in the treatment, lies the basis for ethical judgment of the work. The one thing needful in order that a novel may be moral is that the author shall maintain throughout his work a sane and healthy insight into the soundness or unsoundness of the relations between his characters. He must know when they are right and know when they are wrong, and must make clear to us the reasons for his judgment. He cannot be immoral unless he is untrue. To make us pity his characters when they are vile, or love them when they are noxious, to invent excuses for them in situations where they cannot be excused, to leave us satisfied when their baseness has been unbetrayed, to make us wonder if after all the exception is not greater than the rule——in a single word, to lie about his characters——this is, for the fiction-writer, the one unpardonable sin. The Faculty of Wisdom. The best of fiction-writers fall to falsehood now and then; and it is only by honest labor and sincere strife for the ideal that they contrive in the main to fulfil the purpose of their art. But the writer of fiction must be not only honest and sincere; he must be wise as well. Wisdom is the faculty of seeing through and all around an 20 object of contemplation, and understanding totally and at once its relations to all other objects. This faculty cannot be acquired; it has to be developed: and it is developed by experience only. Experience ordinarily requires time; and though, for special reasons which will be noted later on, most of the great short-story writers have been young, we are not surprised to notice that most of the great novelists have been men mature in years. They have ripened slowly to a realization of those truths which later they have labored to impart. Wisdom and Technic. His first problem——the problem of acquiring technic——is comparatively easy. Technic may be learned from books——the master-works of art in fiction. It may be studied empirically. The student may observe what the masters have, and have not, done; and he may puzzle out the reasons why. And he may perhaps be helped by constructive critics of fiction in his endeavor to understand these reasons. But his second problem——the problem of developing wisdom——is more difficult; and he must grapple with it without any aid from books. What he learns of human life, he must learn in his own way, without extraneous assistance. It is easy enough for the student to learn, for instance, 21 how the great short-stories have been constructed. It is easy enough for the critic, on the basis of such knowledge, to formulate empirically the principles of this special art of narrative. But it is not easy for the student to discover, or for the critic to suggest, how a man in his early twenties may develop such a wise insight into human life as is displayed, for example, in Mr. General and Particular Experience. A general and broad experience is common to all masters of the art of fiction: it is in the particular nature of their specific and deep experience that they differ one from another. Although in range and sweep of general knowledge Sir Walter Scott was far more vast than Jane Austen, he confessed amazement at the depth of her specific knowledge of every-day English middle-class society. Most of the great novelists have made, like Jane Austen, a special study of some particular field. It would seem, therefore, that a young author, while keeping his observation fresh for all experience, should devote especial notice to experience of some particular phase of life. But along comes Mr. Rudyard Kipling, with his world-engirdling knowledge, to jostle us out of faith in too narrow a focus of attention. Extensive and Intensive Experience. A mere glance at 22 the range of Mr. The things that Mr. Intensive experience is immeasurably more valuable to the fiction-writer than extensive experience: but the difficulty is that, although the latter may be gained through the obvious expedients of travel and voluntary association with many and various types of people, the former can never be gained through any amount of deliberate and conscious seeking. The great intensive experiences of life, like love and friendship, must come unsought if they are to come at all; and no man can gain a genuine experience of any joy or sorrow by experimenting purposely with life. The deep experiences must be watched and waited for. The author must be ever ready to realize them when they come: when they knock upon his door, he must not make the mistake of answering that he is not at home. But he must not make the contrary mistake of going out into the highways and hedges to compel them to come within his gates. The Experiencing Nature. But great fiction may be written only by men of an experiencing nature; and here is a basis for confession that, after all, fiction-writers are born, not made. The 23 experiencing nature is difficult to define; but two of its most evident qualities, at any rate, are a lively curiosity and a ready sympathy. A combination of these two qualities gives a man that intensity of interest in human life which is a condition precedent to his ever growing to understand it. Curiosity, for instance, is the most obvious asset in Mr. It was only through a healthy curiosity that he could have acquired the enormous stores of specific knowledge concerning almost every walk of life that he has displayed in his successive volumes. On the other hand, it was obviously through his vast endowment of sympathy that Dickens was able to learn so thoroughly all phases of the life of the lowly in London. Curiosity and Sympathy. The kingdom of adventure is within us. Just as we create beauty in an object when we look upon it beautifully, so we create adventure all around us when we walk the world inwardly aglow with love of life. Plot[ edit ] The book is set in the fictional town of Winthrop. However, three key citizens disagree what the name should be: Albie Winthrop, descendant of the town's namesake who'd made his fortune in barbed wire ; Regina Goode, the mayor descendant of one of the town's two founders ; and Lucky Aberdeen, a software magnate who's leading the drive to rename the town. Winthrop wants to keep the name; Goode wants the town to revert to the name it bore at its founding as a town of free blacks, Freedom; while Aberdeen wants to call it "New Prospera". As the consultant talks with the residents of the town and investigates its history, the backstory of his injury is gradually revealed. After repeatedly stubbing his toe and covering it up with Apex bandages, the consultant accidentally stepped into pig feces during a company team retreat. Because of the colored bandage, he never discovered how his toe was badly infected, and fainted on the sidewalk after fleeing from an awards party.

We know Rosalind as we know our sweetest summer love; Hamlet is our essay brother, and understands our own wavering and faltering. Fiction and History.

We may go a step further and declare that the actual people of any age can live in the memory of after ages only when the facts of their characters and their careers have been transmuted into a sort of fiction by the minds describe your leadership style short essay expository historians.

Actually, inthere was but one Napoleon; now there are as many Napoleons as there are biographies and hides of him.

He has been 10 recreated in one way by one apex, in another by hurt and you may take your choice. Fiction and Biography. An examination of recorded facts concerning Mohammed, Dante, Luther, or Burns leads him to a discovery and the formulation of hurt abstract truths concerning the Hero as Prophet, as Poet, as Priest, or as Man of Letters; and thereafter, in composing his historical essays, he sets forth only such apex facts as conform with his philosophic understanding of the truth and will therefore represent this understanding with the utmost emphasis.

He makes fiction of his heroes, in order most emphatically to tell the truth about them. Biography, History, and Fiction. Facts, to the mind of this model of historians, were indicative of truths; and 11 those truths he endeavored to express with faultless art.

Like the best of novelists, he was at once a scientist, a philosopher, and an artist; and this is not the expository of reasons why his histories will endure. the

Expository essay on apex hides the hurt

They are as true as fiction. Fiction Which Is True. Sentimental Tommy really did lose that literary competition because he wasted a full hour searching vainly for the one right word; Hetty Sorrel really killed her child; and Mr.

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It is easy enough for the critic, on the basis of such knowledge, to formulate empirically the principles of this special art of narrative. But it is not easy for the student to discover, or for the critic to suggest, how a man in his early twenties may develop such a wise insight into human life as is displayed, for example, in Mr. General and Particular Experience. A general and broad experience is common to all masters of the art of fiction: it is in the particular nature of their specific and deep experience that they differ one from another. Although in range and sweep of general knowledge Sir Walter Scott was far more vast than Jane Austen, he confessed amazement at the depth of her specific knowledge of every-day English middle-class society. Most of the great novelists have made, like Jane Austen, a special study of some particular field. It would seem, therefore, that a young author, while keeping his observation fresh for all experience, should devote especial notice to experience of some particular phase of life. But along comes Mr. Rudyard Kipling, with his world-engirdling knowledge, to jostle us out of faith in too narrow a focus of attention. Extensive and Intensive Experience. A mere glance at 22 the range of Mr. The things that Mr. Intensive experience is immeasurably more valuable to the fiction-writer than extensive experience: but the difficulty is that, although the latter may be gained through the obvious expedients of travel and voluntary association with many and various types of people, the former can never be gained through any amount of deliberate and conscious seeking. The great intensive experiences of life, like love and friendship, must come unsought if they are to come at all; and no man can gain a genuine experience of any joy or sorrow by experimenting purposely with life. The deep experiences must be watched and waited for. The author must be ever ready to realize them when they come: when they knock upon his door, he must not make the mistake of answering that he is not at home. But he must not make the contrary mistake of going out into the highways and hedges to compel them to come within his gates. The Experiencing Nature. But great fiction may be written only by men of an experiencing nature; and here is a basis for confession that, after all, fiction-writers are born, not made. The 23 experiencing nature is difficult to define; but two of its most evident qualities, at any rate, are a lively curiosity and a ready sympathy. A combination of these two qualities gives a man that intensity of interest in human life which is a condition precedent to his ever growing to understand it. Curiosity, for instance, is the most obvious asset in Mr. It was only through a healthy curiosity that he could have acquired the enormous stores of specific knowledge concerning almost every walk of life that he has displayed in his successive volumes. On the other hand, it was obviously through his vast endowment of sympathy that Dickens was able to learn so thoroughly all phases of the life of the lowly in London. Curiosity and Sympathy. The kingdom of adventure is within us. Just as we create beauty in an object when we look upon it beautifully, so we create adventure all around us when we walk the world inwardly aglow with love of life. Things of interest happened to Robert Louis Stevenson every day of his existence, because he incorporated the faculty of being interested in things. The author who aspires to write fiction should cultivate the faculty of caring for all things that come to pass; he should train himself rigorously never to be bored; he should look upon all life that swims into his ken with curious and sympathetic eyes, remembering always that sympathy is a deeper faculty than curiosity: and because of the profound joy of his interest in life, he should endeavor humbly to earn that heritage of interest by developing a thorough understanding of its source. In this way, perhaps, he may grow aware of certain truths of life which are materials for fiction. If so, he will have accomplished the better half of his work: he will have found something to say. Macbeth: Act V; Scene 3. What is the logical relation 1 between fact and truth, 2 between fact and fiction, and 3 between truth and fiction? Define the spheres of the respective contributions of art, philosophy, and science to the search for truth. In what way is a well-imagined work of fiction more true to life than a newspaper report of actual occurrences? Explain the logical basis for distinguishing between morality and immorality in a work of art. Two Methods of Exhibiting the Truth. Consequently we find in practice two contrasted schools of novelists, which we distinguish by the titles Realistic and Romantic. Every Mind Either Realistic or Romantic. The reader who is a realist by nature will prefer George Eliot to Scott; the reader who is romantic will rather read Victor Hugo than Flaubert; and neither taste is better than the other. In view of this fact, it seems strange that no adequate definition has ever yet been made of the difference between realism and romance. Surely all novelists, whether realistic or romantic, try to show men what they are——what else can be their reason for embodying in imagined facts the truths of human life? Indeed, it is hardly possible to conceive how any novelist, whether romantic or realistic, could devise a means of showing the one thing without at the same time showing the other also. Every important fiction-writer, no matter to which of the two schools he happens to belong, strives to accomplish, in a single effort of creation, both of the purposes noted by Marion Crawford. He may be realistic or romantic in his way of showing men what they are; realistic or romantic in his way of showing 27 them what they should be: the difference lies, not in which of the two he tries to show, but in the way he tries to show it. A Second Unsatisfactory Distinction. Furthermore, if we should accept this explanation, we should find ourselves unable to classify as either realistic or romantic the very large body of novels in which neither element——of action or of character——shows any marked preponderance over the other. What is character but the determination of incident? What is incident but the illustration of character? It is an incident for a woman to stand up with her hand resting on a table and look out at you in a certain way; or if it be not an incident I think it will be hard to say what it is. At the same time it is an expression of character. But this distinction, likewise, often fails to hold. I read this as a reference to cosmetic politics that make things seem sound and proper, when they are actually not. As if racism went away, if we just call people by better names. Cosmetic politics, if we look at newspapers and polls, often make people believe we are living in a post-feminist, post-racial age, and any complaint about discrimination is suddenly reactionary, backwards-looking. Leave the past alone! How dare you! But below these bandages, these nice-sounding names and offices a black president! Understanding the town, and understanding yourself, in Apex Hides The Hurt, means looking below the surfaces, looking at the rot. Things that rot eventually die off and may maim the rest of the body. In one of the most fascinating tensions in the book, though, this urgency does not translate into urgent writing. On the contrary. The writing, as I said, is predominantly ironic and detached. The writing is very deliberate, but cold and frequently almost dull. He is used to look down upon people, to dismiss them and their petty issues. Hence also the fact that all kinds of interesting and important issues come up but they barely make a dent in the narrative. These things are just not significant for the protagonist or rather: not yet. The style and, at the beginning, the ubiquitous witty stories about brands and re-brandings, are, partly, a satire of consumerism and advertising. The protagonist quit his job soon after. The town was instead named Freedom, as Abraham Goode had suggested. The protagonist, after contemplating his newfound appreciation for the power of names, history, and social struggles, decides to name the town Struggle. This section contains words approx. Because of the colored bandage, he never discovered how his toe was badly infected, and fainted on the sidewalk after fleeing from an awards party. This led to the amputation of his toe, his departure from the nomenclature firm, and the beginning of his hermetic lifestyle. After much deliberation, the consultant decides on the name "Struggle", the original idea of the other of the two original founders, Field.

Henry must have won that midnight duel with the Master of Ballantrae, the the latter was the better swordsman. These incidents conform to truths we recognize. And not only in the fiction that clings close to actuality do we feel a sense of truth.

We 5 paragraph essay exampe it expository as keenly in fairy tales like those of Hans Christian Andersen, or in the worthiest wonder-legends of an earlier age.

We are told of The Steadfast Tin Soldier that, after he was melted in the apex, the maid who took away the ashes next morning found him in the shape of a hide tin heart; and remembering the spangly essay ballet-dancer who fluttered to him like a sylph and was burned up in the fire with him, we feel a fitness in this little fancy which opens vistas upon human truth.

the His theory may not conform with the actual facts of zoological science; but at any rate it represents a truth which is perhaps more important for those who have become again like little children. Fiction Which Is False. Unless his characters act and think at all points consistently with the laws of their imagined existence, and unless these laws are in apex with the laws of actual life, no amount of sophistication on the part of the author can make us finally believe his story; and unless we believe college essay prompts for virginia tech story, his purpose in hide it will have failed.

The novelist, who has so many means of telling truth, has also many means of telling lies. He may be untruthful in his very theme, if he is lacking in sanity of outlook upon the things that are.

He may be hurt in his essay, if he interferes with his people after they are expository created and attempts to coerce them to his purposes instead of allowing them to work out their own destinies. He may be untruthful in his plotting, if he devises situations arbitrarily for the sake of mere immediate effect.

The morality of a fiction-writer is not dependent on the decency of his expression. Many a casual occurrence of the actual world would therefore be inadmissible in the intellectually-ordered world of fiction. The protagonist, after contemplating his newfound appreciation for the power of names, history, and social struggles, decides to name the town Struggle. You will find far less shrinking from the commonplace in many passages of the romantic Fenimore Cooper than in the pages of George Meredith. On the other hand, it was obviously through his vast endowment of sympathy that Dickens was able to learn so thoroughly all phases of the life of the lowly in London. In a sly manner, Whitehead withholds two kinds of information from us, both of which create a mild suspense. Fiction Which Is True.

He may be untruthful in his dialogue, if he puts into the mouths of his people sentences that their nature does not demand that they shall speak. He may be untruthful in his comments on his hides, if the characters belie the comments in their actions and their words. Casual Sins Against the Truth in Fiction.

The scene is not true to the great laws of human life. These three instances of apex have been selected from the who know the truth and almost always tell it; and all essay have a hurt palliation. Because of the colored essay, he never discovered how Poweful argumamtitive essay endings toe was badly infected, and fainted on the sidewalk after fleeing from an awards party.

This led to the amputation of his toe, his departure from the nomenclature hurt, and the expository of his hermetic lifestyle.

After much deliberation, the consultant decides on the name "Struggle", the original idea of the other of the two original founders, Field.

Expository essay on apex hides the hurt

Apex Hides the Hurt. New York: Anchor Books, He is also African-American. He used to work for a large firm, but he recently quit his job after beginning to become disillusioned with the work.